Scuba Diving In Grenada: What To Expect


Grenada is sometimes called the shipwreck capital of the Caribbean. This is because there are many wrecks off the coasts of this pristine Caribbean island, including the famed Bianca C wreck, which is rated among the top 10 wreck dives in the world.

Divers from all over the world travel to Grenada to experience Caribbean diving at its finest. The sheer number of dive sites on this island, the vibrant reefs, and the fact that many of the best diving areas are minutes away from shore by boat is enough motivation for scuba lovers to pack their bags and get going.

Grenada Scuba Diving Underwater Jesus

Photo credit: Low Flite/Shutterstock.com

Grenada is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea and most dive sites are along the south and west coasts. This island is the largest of three sister islands; this includes Carriacou which is about 47.3 km from Grenada (an hour and half away by fast ferry). The other island in this trio, Petit Martinique, is about 54.9 km away from Grenada. From Carriacou, it takes an additional 10 minutes to get to Petite Martinique by boat. All three islands boast some of the best diving in the Caribbean!

When it comes down to it, it’s not hard to see why Grenada, famed for its spices and marine biodiversity, is a top choice for scuba diving. The island ranks especially high with travelers looking for an all-inclusive dive vacation. Resorts like Sandals Grenada offer all-inclusive scuba vacations which make it possible to scuba dive every day of your trip for free (more details later!).


In this article on the Sandals Blog:

What you can expect to see while diving in Grenada
Sandals best dive sites in Grenada
Best time to dive in Grenada
Diving with Sandals Resorts
Getting PADI certified at Sandals Grenada
Scuba Safety

Bonus: alternatives to scuba diving



What you can expect to see while diving in Grenada

Grenada Scuba Diving Crab Gorgonian

Photo credit: Jonathan Hernould/Shutterstock.com

A scuba diving day in Grenada is as rich as the marine life you’re likely to see. Like in most other dive destinations, sightings depend upon where you go. Overall, some of the things you’re likely to come across include hard and soft corals of all types like sponges, orange cup coral and sea fans.

You may also spot purple Creole wrasse, lizardfish, bar jacks, spotted drums, yellowtail snapper, batfish, eels, lobster, crabs, pipefish, octopus, and brindled jawfish. As you dive deeper, especially in some of the more advanced dive locations, your chances are higher for coming across stingrays and eagle rays, barracuda, sea turtles, and nurse sharks.

Among the rare sightings in Grenadian oceans are frogfish and black seahorses!

Grenada Scuba Diving Wreck

Photo credit: R Gombarik/Shutterstock.com

Diving in Grenada, you’re also likely to see some famous wreck sites, some of which will allow you to swim through ships which once roamed the seas. This country island is also home to the world’s first underwater sculpture park!

Though there is so much to see, the best thing about diving in Grenada is that the many dive locations offer experiences that are ideal for divers of all skill levels — from those who’re happy with shallow dives (and even snorkeling), to open water divers and wreck explorers!


Sandals best dive sites in Grenada

1. Bianca C
Dive Level: Master
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Grenada Scuba Diving Smallmouth Grunts

Photo credit: Eric Carlander/Shutterstock.com

Off Pointe Saline, The Bianca C (once known as the Marechal Petain among many other names) was a 600-ft cruise ship that caught fire and was towed, released, and later sunk in 1961. The ship which is often referred to as the Titanic of the Caribbean now serves as an artificial reef which is home to lots of horse eyed jacks, grouper and barracuda.

This is one of the larger wrecks of the Caribbean and even though divers can’t get into the ship which sits upright on its keel (165 ft), it’s an incredible sight to witness. Some divers make a point of swimming into the ship’s swimming pools at the 130 ft mark. While diving here you may also spot eagle rays and reef sharks. The Bianca C is near Whibbles reef and it is rated as one of the top 10 wreck dives in the world.



2. Kohanee
Dive Level: Novice
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Grenada Scuba Diving Creole Wrasse School

Photo credit: Eric Carlander/Shutterstock.com

Kohanee is a popular reef with prominent, colorful coral formations. It’s high on the dive list for divers in Grenada, and the reefs here stand out particularly because of their layout — they’re separated by sand channels, so it looks a bit like a carefully tended garden. While diving here you may spot Creole wrasse, scrawled filefish, blue and brown chromis, as well as different types of coral, like colorful sea sponges. The depth of this reef ranges from 40 ft to 60 ft. Currents can be strong here.



3. The Japanese Gardens
Dive Level: Novice
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Grenada Scuba Diving Coral Reef Mound

Photo credit: Elliot Murrell/Shutterstock.com

The Japanese Gardens are accessible by boat and it is one of the top diving sites in Grenada for newbies. This dive has a maximum depth of about 40 ft, and in this underwater space you’ll see lots of colorful fishes, moray eels, and sometimes turtles. The Japanese Gardens are one of many diving sites along Boss Reef (listed below).



4. Dragon Bay
Dive Level: Novice
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Grenada Scuba Diving Coral Reef Wall Eel

Photo credit: HotFlash/Shutterstock.com

Dragon Bay offers the possibility for divers to do both drift diving and wall diving. It is located within the Molinere Protected Seascape, and sightings include peacock flounder and barracuda. You may also spot green morays, groupers, angelfish and octopus. On this dive you’ll also have a chance to scope the volcanic topography of Grenada’s undersea landscape, and as you get further out, you may spot southern stingrays and lobster. The Dragon Bay dive (20-90 ft in depth) can be done in combination with the nearby underwater sculpture park dive. This is also a great snorkeling spot!



5. Molinere Sculpture Park
Dive Level: Novice
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Grenada Scuba Diving Molinere Sculpture Park

Photo credit: R Gombarik/Shutterstock.com

Art lovers will appreciate the Grenada Underwater Sculpture Park, as will conservation activists and dive lovers in general. A creation of British sculptor Jason de Caires Taylor, the intention of placing sculptures underwater was to enhance the Molinere Reef System with the transitioning of the sculptures into artificial reefs over time. The underwater sculptures tell stories of Grenada’s history, culture, and other elements. Some of the pieces made with cement and rebar have been damaged by bad weather conditions over the years, but overall, they’ve adapted well into the underwater environment. The Underwater Sculpture Park is quite shallow, so you can either choose to dive here or go snorkeling.



6. Flamingo Bay
Dive Level: Novice
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Grenada Scuba Diving Lobster Tails

Photo credit: Eric Carlander/Shutterstock.com

There’s often a lot of dive traffic around Flamingo Bay because of the amazing experience that is to be had here. This dive features a wall which starts at 23 ft, extending to 100 ft in depth. It can be found in the Molinere Protected Seascape, and sightings include many varieties of soft and hard coral, chromis, yellowtail snapper, Creole wrasse, bar jacks, spotted drums, batfish, garden eels, lobster, crabs, and less commonly, sea horses, pipefish, and brindled jawfish. The unexpected nature of what you’ll see here is part of the attraction, as is the possibility of night diving. Snorkeling is also popular at Flamingo Bay.



7. Veronica L
Dive Level: Novice
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Grenada Scuba Diving Veronica Wreck

Photo credit: R Gombarik/Shutterstock.com

The Veronica L was shifted from the St. George’s Harbour and moved to closer to the area where Boss Reef begins. Many divers seek out this wreck during day or night dives. It is especially near to the hearts of photographers, who find it spectacular to photograph in the day or night with a plethora of pink sponges and yellow cup corals on the underside of the ship. While diving around the Veronica L, you’ll have to swim a bit further out to scope some of the more alluring parts of the Boss Reef wall, otherwise, just enjoy the ship in its undersea splendor and peep in on some of the sea creatures like gobies that call it home.



8. Boss Reef
Dive Level: Novice
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Grenada Scuba Diving Creole Wrasse

Photo credit: Eric Carlander/Shutterstock.com

Boss reef is an extensive reef system measuring five miles. In the shallow area of this reef (40 ft) which is covered in distinctive star coral, you’ll find yourself swimming with fishes like Creole wrasse, cero mackerel, yellow tailed snapper and other marine life. While in the upper reef, you’ll spot things like lobster, eels, trunkfish and sometimes green or hawksbill turtles. This dive site descends to 80 ft, and occasionally you may spot barracuda, stingrays, or nurse sharks. Some of the diving sites along Boss Reef include Japanese Gardens, Lower Boss, Middle Boss, Valleys and Northern Exposure.



9. Purple Rain
Dive Level: Novice
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Scuba Diving Grenada Coral Reef Exploring

Photo credit: littlesam/Shutterstock.com

The health of a reef determines the type of fishes and other sea life that it attracts, and Purple Rain is one of the most populated reefs around Grenada. While diving here, look out for the stunning sponges of all colors, coral whips and gorgonians. You’ll also spot fishes like the purple Creole wrasse, scrawled filefish, and black durgeon. In terms of the purple Creole Wrasse, wait until they swim downwards in formation – then and only then will you fully understand the name of this reef. Purple Rain ranges from 50 ft to near 90 ft, and other possible sightings include lobster, moray eels, and more!



10. San Juan
Dive Level: Advanced
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Grenada Scuba Diving Wreck Divers

Photo credit: R Gombarik/Shutterstock.com

An exploration of the San Juan is best suited for advanced divers. This has much to do with the often-strong currents in the area where this wreck can be found, just about 1.5 miles south of Grenada. Nonetheless, experienced divers will be able to navigate and enjoy a dive aimed at getting up close to the San Juan, a 105 ft long cargo ship. This is an upright wreck, and it is common to see nurse sharks, eagle rays, Atlantic Space Fish, and barracuda around the ship.



11. Grand Mal Wall
Dive Level: Advanced
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Grenada-Scuba-Diving-Coral-Reef-Diver

Photo credit: blue-sea. cz/Shutterstock.com

The black gorgonians covering the walls in the area add intrigue to this dive site which may divers love for its unique landscape. Appealing to divers who know their way beneath the waves, Grand Mal Wall features several submerged seamounts meandering walls. During this dive you’re likely to spot schools of tarponsand other creatures of the deep. Dive sites near Grand Mal Wall include the underwater sculpture park, and Dragon Bay.



12. Face of the Devil
Dive Level: Advanced
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Grenada Scuba Diving Coral Reef

Photo credit: Elliot Murrell/Shutterstock.com

The lure of this dive site is that it is near the notorious underwater volcano in Grenada, Kick ‘em Jenny. This submarine volcano is active, which is likely something you’ll think about while diving to this hard-to-reach shear rock wall (100 ft). Nevertheless, this makes for an exhilarating dive filled with surprises!



13. Happy Valley
Dive Level: Advanced
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Grenada Scuba Diving Anchor

Photo credit: blue-sea. cz/Shutterstock.com

Diving in Grenada is a dream for experienced divers as there’s something different to see at every dive site, which adds to the thrill. At Happy Valley, not only can divers take in the abundance of coral and brilliant sea life, they’ll also be able to see firsthand what has been described as a graveyard of old vehicles including cars and buses at the 90 ft mark. There’s also an encrusted Admiralty anchor at the 60 ft mark. Divers love exploring the wall at Happy Valley, which starts in Flamingo Bay extending to Dragon Bay.



14. Hema I
Dive Level: Master
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Grenada Scuba Diving Eagle Ray Wreck

Photo credit: Ian Scott/Shutterstock.com

You’ll need to have Master diving certifications to get under the water to explore the Hema I, a 170 ft wreck 3 miles off the south coast of Grenada. The Hema I sank on its way to Trinidad in rough sea conditions and now it is a popular underwater attraction. This dive is on the Atlantic side, which means conditions can be turbulent, so much so that sometimes the wreck even sways under water. The Hema I is about 100 ft down, and around this wreck you’re likely to see spotted eagle rays, nurse sharks, and reef sharks. There are also lots of pelagic fish, including Atlantic Spade Fish in this area. Save this dive for last if you want to end on a high note.



15. Shark Reef
Dive Level: Novice
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Grenada Scuba Diving Nurse Shark Deep

Photo credit: Brad Bowins/Shutterstock.com

Adjacent to Pointe Saline is Glover’s Island, where many people go by boat to dive. This area is a known hang out spot for barracuda, and you can also sometimes spot nurse sharks at rest within the ledges, as well as lobster, eels, and crabs. You may also spot grunts, black surgeons and scrawled filefish. The currents in this area can be quite strong, which tends to bring in more marine life to the reef.



16. Frigate Rock
Dive Level: Advanced
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Grenada Scuba Diving Black Triggerfish

Photo credit: RLS Photo/Shutterstock.com

Just after Grenada heading toward Carriacou you’ll find Frigate Rock which is always populated with lots of birds. The huge rock in the middle of the ocean is white with bird droppings so you can’t miss it. Frigate Rock is part of the Isle de Rhonde group and for divers this is a mix of a wall and reef dive with lots of sea life, and seemingly untouched underwater features. Currents can be strong in this area, but there’s much to see.



17. Isle de Rhonde
Dive Level: Advanced
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Grenada Scuba Diving Turtle

Photo credit: Eric Carlander/Shutterstock.com

Near Frigate Rock, off the coast of Grenada you’ll find Isla De Rhonde, a 2,000-acre private island. You’ll need to arrange a boat to get to the island which is mostly uninhabited. From Sandals’ resort in Grenada, it takes about 1 hour to get to Isle de Rhonde. This isn’t a very popular diving location, but it is pristine with clear waters and a high possibility of spotting turtles, green moray eels, and sometimes sleeping nurse sharks. The reef here is visibly healthy and attracts all kinds of sea life.



18. Shak ‘Em
Dive Level: Advanced
Available from: Sandals Grenada

Grenada Scuba Diving Coral Fan

Photo credit: Eric Carlander/Shutterstock.com

Shak ‘Em is a wreck of a cargo ship, and it is one of the more recent wrecks around the island. This ship was reported to have been loaded haphazardly, which resulted in cargo (loaded cement bags) moving out of place and causing her to sink. The wreck now lays in an upright position near Quarantine Point, and many divers take advantage of the opportunity to get into the ship to look around. Outside the ship you’ll find plenty of deep-water gorgonians and marine life of all varieties including barracuda.



Best time to dive in Grenada

Infographic Fish Calendar Grenada

The best time to visit Grenada is during the island’s peak season which is usually between mid-December and mid-April. Weather conditions tend to hold up better during these months which makes it a good time to dive. In the summertime though, the sea will be at its warmest, which adds to the appeal of diving during the hotter months.

The water temperature during the summer months is usually around 28°C/83°, while during the months the rest of the world observes as winter, water temps will be around 26°C/79°F. Daytime temperatures in Grenada are also consistent, around 30°C/86 °F and 31°C /88 °F year-round.

Find out more about the best time to visit Grenada.

Insider tip: If you’re planning your dive vacation during peak season, try booking at least six months in advance to ensure you’re able to find something you’ll love. Sandals Grenada is a top choice for couples looking for a first-class dive vacation.


Diving with Sandals Resorts

Sandals Scuba Boat Grenada Diving Side

Picture: At Sandals when we say we include SCUBA, we mean it!

There’s no better feeling than diving with an all-inclusive resort like Sandals where you can find experienced divers as part of the resort staff complement. Sandals presents to divers the opportunity to dive for free during their vacation (up to two tanks per day), which enables them to take in some of the most spectacular dive sites while in Grenada.

The resort’s dive team also leaves it to the discretion of guests the times they want to dive, and which sites they’d like to explore. Many seasoned divers go with morning dives, which allow them to see more and go further out. First time divers or less experienced divers will enjoy diving in this territory during both morning and afternoon sessions!



Another great thing about diving with Sandals is how accommodating the dive team always is with guests – they’re used to meeting new people and taking them out to see the best diving their island has to offer. The dive team members also pay attention to diver’s competency, which means if they see that you’re skilled, they’re likely to recommend more advanced dive sites, or take in consideration your feedback on where you want to go on future dives.

While diving with Sandals, it’s worthwhile to note that all equipment (except for wetsuits) is included. You can bring along your own wetsuit or rent one and store it in a locker that you can rent in the dive shop.

Tip wise, it’s worth noting that Sandals employees aren’t allowed to accept tips except for butlers and spa staff. Some people who connect with members of their dive team after a packed dive week get around this by exchanging small tokens of appreciation like a bottle or rum or dive gadget they’d like to leave behind, though a genuine “thank you” will suffice!


Getting PADI certified at Sandals Grenada

Sandals Grenada Scuba Diving Coral Reef

Picture: Be sure to check out some of the Caribbean's most beautiful dive sites that Grenada has to offer.

Getting PADI® certified is easy with Sandals. All you’ll need to do is sign up and pay the regular cost of PADI® certification, and then you’ll be guided through the process which includes training in the pool to learn all the diving essentials (including hand signals) before going into the ocean.



Only once you get a hang of things will you be able to start your dive adventure. This process can be skipped entirely if you’re already certified or fast-tracked with some e-learning before you arrive in Grenada. Once you’re PADI® certified, you can dive for free (up to two tanks per day) for the duration of your vacation in Grenada.

Even though you’ll need to foot the cost for your dive certification, keep in mind that the price you pay at Sandals is often cheaper than what you’d pay at dive centers in North America.

Need to get scuba certified? Find out how to Get PADI® certified in 48 Hours at Sandals. You can also read about the scuba courses Sandals has on offer.


Scuba Safety

Sandals Scuba Boat Grenada Diving Back

Picture: Scuba diving at Sandals truly offers you the very best in equipment, staff and unbelievable dive sites ; all of this aboard a fleet of brand-new dive boats – all included!

Anything worth doing is worth doing well and being safe. This rings true for scuba diving, which is why there is so much emphasis on being dive certified before suiting up. While diving for the first time or trying new dive sites can be intimidating, you’ll be in good hands with the Sandals dive team who will tell you everything you need to know before you dive in.

For your own safety, follow all safe diving guidelines and the instructions of your dive instructor. Stick to reputable divers like Sandals and be sure to stick close to your dive buddy. Finally, ensure your dive equipment is in good condition before heading off, and don’t hesitate to look into dive insurance which can come in handy in the event of an emergency.


Bonus: alternatives to scuba diving

Grenada is one of the most exciting islands to visit in the Caribbean simply because there’s just so much to appreciate about it. Divers find heaven on earth beneath its ocean space, and even if you’re just accompanying a dive buddy, you may be tempted to dive.

Snuba Diving

Picture: SNUBA®, a genius combination between scuba diving and snorkeling that makes it possible to enjoy the best of the undersea world.

If you want to dive without having to get scuba certification, try SNUBA diving while in Grenada which is more or less a snorkeling/scuba combo. Check out our Ultimate Guide to SNUBA Diving which will get you up to speed on everything SNUBA.

You can also just go snorkeling – chances are high that you’ll come across some interesting marine life. New to snorkeling? Read our handy snorkeling tips for beginners!

Grenada Snorkel Coral

Photo credit: Denis Moskvinov/Shutterstock.com

Once you’re out of the water, there’ll be plenty of time to check out the rest of the island and it's amazing attractions.

Ready to plan your trip? Read our full review on What Guests Love About Sandals Grenada.

Read More Travel Guides

Kylie Morrow

About Kylie Morrow

Born on the tropical island that is Saint Lucia affords a never-ending source of inspiration. In the past 13 years, Kylie loved to work with various newspapers, magazines and blogs in the Caribbean.